Warhol was wrong: In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 seconds

Gangnam Style. 334 million hits on YouTube and now a #1 single in the UK music chart. Hats off to Psy for creating a worldwide phenomenon and also for spawning a plethora of spoof and clone videos trying to cash in. But with the recognition comes the harsh reality: social just doesn’t stick anymore.

People are consuming media at a ferocious rate. People want information now, not in tomorrow’s newspaper roundup of yesterday’s news. Gangnam is the flavour of the month now but tomorrow it’ll be something else and it’ll quickly pass into annoying obscurity.

Before, marketing and advertising stuck in memory (‘Is it live or is it Memorex‘) or built up over time to be enduring and endearing before verging on the frustratingly annoying (Howard from the HBOS adverts). Social media is becoming the McDonalds of the internet; fast consumption designed to quell an immediate pang but not the hunger. It is disposable and forgetful.

Can you remember last week’s trending topic on Twitter? Can you even remember yesterday’s?

There is no doubt that the reach of social media is on a scale that marketing has never had before, an audience who are eager to monitor and quickly snatch what they can, and what marketing departments struggle to comprehend is that they are still designing campaigns using traditional design methods for traditional methods of delivery. 

But there’s another problem underlying the social ecosystem. The users themselves. The appetite is for ‘everything, on all the time, what and when we want to consume’. So it spawns those seeking their piece of Internet history. Fame is becoming a fast food commodity; you’ll trend tomorrow and be forgotten by Thursday. Conversation and interest will burst into a supernova of activity and then dissipate to nothing, you’ll mark your entrance to the Halls of Fame with a party only to be turfed out by the bouncers just as quick because your impersonators have taken your place as the host. You are no longer live nor Memorex.

Andy Warhol didn’t see it coming. If he had access to social media back then he’d have shortened his famous quote. In this high speed social junk world, you’ve only got 15 seconds to impress the world. Make it count.

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Categories: Disruption, Marketing, Social / Collaboration

Author:Theo Priestley

"I had more creative ideas from Theo in 6 months than I have had in 6 years from most people." Theo Priestley is one of the most recognised independent technology industry influencers and evangelists, ranking in the Top 100 thought leaders across Virtual/ Augmented Reality, FinTech, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Internet of Things and future trends. Theo has written insights for Forbes, Wired, The European Magazine, Venturebeat to name a few, and has been interviewed for many online publications including the BBC on his thoughts on technology and the future. A regular paid keynote speaker and panelist at conferences and events, Theo is engaged for his forthright views and isn't afraid to challenge conventional thinking and the marketing hype surrounding the industry when presenting, never pulling punches to get the message across on how technology can be applied to improve business and the customer experience. He has also successfully organised and run TEDx and Ignite events. Highly active across social networks, he sits in the Top 1% for social media engagement on Kred and Klout and is constantly sharing articles and his analysis that he feels his audience would be interested in. Theo is also active in the startup community, mentoring within UK and US accelerators and sits on a number of advisory boards. Former VP and Chief Technology Evangelist at a Top 25 European enterprise software company with a career spanning both innovation strategy and delivery of software and business change in Financial Services, and as an independent technology industry analyst. Follow Theo on Twitter @tprstly or connect here directly for constant insights on tech and marketing trends. • Top 1% Influencer on Kred (915) • Top 1% Influencer on Klout (70+) • 12,000+ Followers on LinkedIn • 13,000+ Followers on Twitter • Recognised Top Influencer in AI, Virtual/ Augmented Reality, Fintech, IOT and Wearable Tech, Big Data and Analytics.

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3 Comments on “Warhol was wrong: In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 seconds”

  1. October 1, 2012 at 8:11 am #

    Or as the My Chemical Romance lyrics go, “Fame is now injectable…”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Election 2012 is so 2011 | Successful Workplace - October 26, 2012

    […] the conversation with phone calls and television advertisements is very old-school in a world where Gangnam Style can capture remarkable attention and there are so many topics that people actually care […]

  2. Election 2012 is so 2011 | Successful Workplace - October 26, 2012

    […] the conversation with phone calls and television advertisements is very old-school in a world where Gangnam Style can capture remarkable attention and there are so many topics that people actually care […]

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